I have taken all of the photos ([Personal Photo Collection]), unless I have otherwise stated. I get my information from the internet.

 


HARBOR PARK; Norfolk, VA
[Personal Photo Collection]
Harbor Park is a stadium along the Elizabeth River, in downtown Norfolk, Virginia, USA. It has been rated the best minor league stadium by Baseball America. It is primarily used for baseball, and is the home field of the Norfolk Tides minor league baseball team. The Tides are the International League AAA farm team for the Baltimore Orioles. Harbor Park opened on April 14, 1993 and seats 12,067 people. Seating includes 9,000 lower deck seats, 2,800 upper deck seats and a 300 person capacity picnic area. The stadium also features 24 luxury skyboxes with seating for 400, and a 225 seat full-service restaurant with a panoramic view of the field from the first base side. A record crowd of 14,263 was reached August 31, 1996.
The field is made of natural grass and features a state of the art irrigation and drainage system. The dimensions are 333 feet in left field, 410 feet in center field and 318 feet in right field.
During Major League Baseball’s search for a new home for the Montreal Expos, Norfolk submitted a proposal which would have expanded Harbor Park to temporarily accommodate a major league team. Norfolk’s bid was rejected and the Expos eventually became the Washington Nationals.
On March 30, 2007, the Washington Nationals played an exhibition game against the Baltimore Orioles. The game was sold out two weeks before the game.
On October 28, 2008, Barack Obama had a rally here.
On December 16, 2008, the city of Norfolk approved a plan by the Tides to build a right field party deck behind the home bullpen. The deck will hold 400 standing people persons and will not add seats to the park, although it would increase standing room area for overflow crowds. The right field fence moved in 20 feet, to accommodate the deck, changing the right field foul line length to 318 feet. The changes were completed by March 15, 2009, two weeks before an Orioles–Nationals exhibition game.
The concert band piece Harbor Park Holiday, written in 1996 by Norfolk native James L. Hosay, was written about Harbor Park.

HARBOR PARK; Norfolk, VA

[Personal Photo Collection]

Harbor Park is a stadium along the Elizabeth River, in downtown Norfolk, Virginia, USA. It has been rated the best minor league stadium by Baseball America. It is primarily used for baseball, and is the home field of the Norfolk Tides minor league baseball team. The Tides are the International League AAA farm team for the Baltimore Orioles. Harbor Park opened on April 14, 1993 and seats 12,067 people. Seating includes 9,000 lower deck seats, 2,800 upper deck seats and a 300 person capacity picnic area. The stadium also features 24 luxury skyboxes with seating for 400, and a 225 seat full-service restaurant with a panoramic view of the field from the first base side. A record crowd of 14,263 was reached August 31, 1996.

The field is made of natural grass and features a state of the art irrigation and drainage system. The dimensions are 333 feet in left field, 410 feet in center field and 318 feet in right field.

During Major League Baseball’s search for a new home for the Montreal Expos, Norfolk submitted a proposal which would have expanded Harbor Park to temporarily accommodate a major league team. Norfolk’s bid was rejected and the Expos eventually became the Washington Nationals.

On March 30, 2007, the Washington Nationals played an exhibition game against the Baltimore Orioles. The game was sold out two weeks before the game.

On October 28, 2008, Barack Obama had a rally here.

On December 16, 2008, the city of Norfolk approved a plan by the Tides to build a right field party deck behind the home bullpen. The deck will hold 400 standing people persons and will not add seats to the park, although it would increase standing room area for overflow crowds. The right field fence moved in 20 feet, to accommodate the deck, changing the right field foul line length to 318 feet. The changes were completed by March 15, 2009, two weeks before an Orioles–Nationals exhibition game.

The concert band piece Harbor Park Holiday, written in 1996 by Norfolk native James L. Hosay, was written about Harbor Park.

TALLY HO MOVIE THEATER; LEESBURG, VA
[photo courtesy: Google Images]
Located in the heart of downtown Leesburg, the Tally Ho is an historic twin theater operating under the management of Market Street Productions. While the venue showcases first-run feature films, it also plays host to movie theme nights, live comedy, magic, and musical acts, as well as private events.

Film Admission Prices
Matinee - $6.75
Evening - $8.75 for Adults, $6.75 for Senior Citizens and Kids 10 and Under. 
Upcoming Attractions
The Hangover, Part 2 (R) — June 10 - June 23
The Green Lantern (PG-13) — June 17 - June 28
Cars 2 (PG) — June 24 - July 14
Transformers: Dark of the Moon (PG-13) — June 29 - July 14
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2 (PG-13) — July 15 - August 04
In the News
Join us at the Tally Ho every Thursday, and your movie ticket will only be $3 - ALL SHOWS/ALL TIMES!

TALLY HO MOVIE THEATER; LEESBURG, VA

[photo courtesy: Google Images]

Located in the heart of downtown Leesburg, the Tally Ho is an historic twin theater operating under the management of Market Street Productions. While the venue showcases first-run feature films, it also plays host to movie theme nights, live comedy, magic, and musical acts, as well as private events.

Film Admission Prices

  • Matinee - $6.75
  • Evening - $8.75 for Adults, $6.75 for Senior Citizens and Kids 10 and Under. 

Upcoming Attractions

  • The Hangover, Part 2 (R) June 10 - June 23
  • The Green Lantern (PG-13)  June 17 - June 28
  • Cars 2 (PG) June 24 - July 14
  • Transformers: Dark of the Moon (PG-13) June 29 - July 14
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2 (PG-13) July 15 - August 04

In the News

Join us at the Tally Ho every Thursday, and your movie ticket will only be $3 - ALL SHOWS/ALL TIMES!

ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY 
[Personal Photo Collection]
Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia, is a military cemetery in the United States of America, established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Confederate general Robert E. Lee’s wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a great grand-daughter of Martha Washington. The cemetery is situated directly across the Potomac River from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.. It is served by the Arlington Cemetery station on the Blue Line of the Washington Metro system.
In an area of 624 acres, veterans and military casualties from each of the nation’s wars are interred in the cemetery, ranging from the American Civil War through to the military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq. Pre-Civil War dead were reinterred after 1900.
Arlington National Cemetery and United States Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery are administered by the Department of the Army. The other national cemeteries are administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs or by the National Park Service. Arlington House (Custis-Lee Mansion) and its grounds are administered by the National Park Service as a memorial to Lee.
Sections 
 
Arlington National Cemetery is divided into 70 sections, with some sections in the southeast portion of the cemetery reserved for future expansion.
Section 60, in the southeast part of the cemetery, is the burial ground for military personnel killed in the Iraq War and the War in Afghanistan. In 2005, Arlington National Cemetery acquired 12 acres of additional land from the National Park Service, along with 17 acres from the Department of Defense that was part of Fort Myer and 44 acres that is the site of the Navy Annex.
 
Section 21, also known as the Nurses Section, is the area of Arlington National Cemetery where many nurses are buried. The Nurses Memorial is located there. In the cemetery, there is a Confederate section with graves of soldiers of the Confederate States of America and a Confederate Memorial. All Confederate headstones are peaked rather than rounded. In Section 27, there are buried more than 3,800 former slaves, called “Contrabands” during the Civil War. Their headstones are designated with the word “Civilian” or “Citizen”.
Tomb of the Unknown
 
The Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery is also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. It stands on top of a hill overlooking Washington, D.C.
One of the more popular sites at the Cemetery, the tomb is made from Yule marble quarried in Colorado. It consists of seven pieces, with a total weight of 79 short tons. The tomb was completed and opened to the public April 9, 1932, at a cost of $48,000.
It was initially named the “Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.” Other unknown servicemen were later entombed there, and it became known as the “Tomb of the Unknowns”, though it has never been officially named. The soldiers entombed there are:
Unknown Soldier of World War I, interred November 11, 1921. President Warren G. Harding presided.
Unknown Soldier of World War II, interred May 30, 1958. President Dwight D. Eisenhower presided.
Unknown Soldier of the Korean War, also interred May 30, 1958. President Dwight Eisenhower presided again, Vice President Richard Nixon acted as next of kin.
Unknown Soldier of the Vietnam War, interred May 28, 1984. President Ronald Reagan presided. The remains of the Vietnam Unknown were disinterred, under the authority of President Bill Clinton, on May 14, 1998, and were identified as those of Air Force 1st Lt. Michael J. Blassie, whose family had him reinterred near their home in St. Louis, Missouri. It has been determined that the crypt at the Tomb of the Unknowns that contained the remains of the Vietnam Unknown will remain empty.
The Tomb of the Unknowns has been perpetually guarded since July 2, 1937, by the U.S. Army. The 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment 
 
(“The Old Guard”) began guarding the Tomb April 6, 1948.
Notable Burials
 
Other frequently visited sites in the cemetery include the grave of President John F. Kennedy, who is buried with his wife and two of their children. His remains were placed there on March 14, 1967, a reinterment from his original Arlington burial site, some 20 feet away, where his body was interred in November 1963. His grave is marked with an eternal flame. The remains of his brothers, Senator Robert F. Kennedy and Senator Edward M. “Ted” Kennedy, are buried nearby. The latter’s graves are marked with simple crosses and footstones. On December 1, 1971, Robert Kennedy’s body was reinterred 100 feet from its original June 1968 burial site.
The first soldier to be buried in Arlington was Private William Henry Christman of Pennsylvania on May 13, 1864.


Notable Civilians
 
Julian Bartley, Sr. (54) and his son Jay Bartley (20), killed together in the 1998 bombing of the U.S. embassy in Nairobi
Harry Blackmun, Thurgood Marshall, William O. Douglas and Potter Stewart, four justices of the Supreme Court of the United States
Leslie Coffelt, Secret Service member killed fighting off would-be-assassins of President Harry S. Truman in the 1950 assassination attempt at Blair House
George Washington Parke Custis, founder of Arlington Plantation, grandson of Martha Washington, step-grandson of President George Washington, father to Mary Anna Custis Lee.
Mary Lee Fitzhugh Custis, wife to George Washington Parke Custis, daughter of William Fitzhugh and Ann Bolling Randolph Fitzhugh, mother to Mary Anna Custis Lee.
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, former First Lady and widow of John F. Kennedy
Phyllis Kirk, famous TV and film actress, alongside her husband.
James Parks, freedman, the only person buried at Arlington Cemetery who was born on the grounds.
Manuel Quezon (1878-1944) – see USS Maine memorial, later transferred to a cemetery in Manila
Mary Randolph, first person to be buried at Arlington Plantation, descendant of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, cousin to Mary Lee Fitzhugh Custis.
Marie Teresa Rios, author of Fifteenth Pelican, basis for The Flying Nun television show.
John Gibson and Jacob Chestnut, United States Capitol Police officers killed in the 1998 Capitol shooting attack
Leslie Sherman, student killed in the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre (her parents Holly and Anthony Sherman are both veterans and will be buried next to their daughter).
Whether or not they were wartime service members, U.S. presidents are eligible to be buried at Arlington, since they oversaw the armed forces as commanders-in-chief.
Four state funerals have been held at Arlington: those of Presidents William Howard Taft and John F. Kennedy, that of General John J. Pershing, and that of U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy.
 

ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY 

[Personal Photo Collection]

Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia, is a military cemetery in the United States of America, established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Confederate general Robert E. Lee’s wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a great grand-daughter of Martha Washington. The cemetery is situated directly across the Potomac River from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.. It is served by the Arlington Cemetery station on the Blue Line of the Washington Metro system.

In an area of 624 acres, veterans and military casualties from each of the nation’s wars are interred in the cemetery, ranging from the American Civil War through to the military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq. Pre-Civil War dead were reinterred after 1900.

Arlington National Cemetery and United States Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery are administered by the Department of the Army. The other national cemeteries are administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs or by the National Park Service. Arlington House (Custis-Lee Mansion) and its grounds are administered by the National Park Service as a memorial to Lee.

Sections 

Arlington National Cemetery is divided into 70 sections, with some sections in the southeast portion of the cemetery reserved for future expansion.

Section 60, in the southeast part of the cemetery, is the burial ground for military personnel killed in the Iraq War and the War in Afghanistan. In 2005, Arlington National Cemetery acquired 12 acres of additional land from the National Park Service, along with 17 acres from the Department of Defense that was part of Fort Myer and 44 acres that is the site of the Navy Annex.

Section 21, also known as the Nurses Section, is the area of Arlington National Cemetery where many nurses are buried. The Nurses Memorial is located there. In the cemetery, there is a Confederate section with graves of soldiers of the Confederate States of America and a Confederate Memorial. All Confederate headstones are peaked rather than rounded. In Section 27, there are buried more than 3,800 former slaves, called “Contrabands” during the Civil War. Their headstones are designated with the word “Civilian” or “Citizen”.

Tomb of the Unknown

The Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery is also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. It stands on top of a hill overlooking Washington, D.C.

One of the more popular sites at the Cemetery, the tomb is made from Yule marble quarried in Colorado. It consists of seven pieces, with a total weight of 79 short tons. The tomb was completed and opened to the public April 9, 1932, at a cost of $48,000.

It was initially named the “Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.” Other unknown servicemen were later entombed there, and it became known as the “Tomb of the Unknowns”, though it has never been officially named. The soldiers entombed there are:

  • Unknown Soldier of World War I, interred November 11, 1921. President Warren G. Harding presided.
  • Unknown Soldier of World War II, interred May 30, 1958. President Dwight D. Eisenhower presided.
  • Unknown Soldier of the Korean War, also interred May 30, 1958. President Dwight Eisenhower presided again, Vice President Richard Nixon acted as next of kin.
  • Unknown Soldier of the Vietnam War, interred May 28, 1984. President Ronald Reagan presided. The remains of the Vietnam Unknown were disinterred, under the authority of President Bill Clinton, on May 14, 1998, and were identified as those of Air Force 1st Lt. Michael J. Blassie, whose family had him reinterred near their home in St. Louis, Missouri. It has been determined that the crypt at the Tomb of the Unknowns that contained the remains of the Vietnam Unknown will remain empty.

The Tomb of the Unknowns has been perpetually guarded since July 2, 1937, by the U.S. Army. The 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment 

(“The Old Guard”) began guarding the Tomb April 6, 1948.

Notable Burials

Other frequently visited sites in the cemetery include the grave of President John F. Kennedy, who is buried with his wife and two of their children. His remains were placed there on March 14, 1967, a reinterment from his original Arlington burial site, some 20 feet away, where his body was interred in November 1963. His grave is marked with an eternal flame. The remains of his brothers, Senator Robert F. Kennedy and Senator Edward M. “Ted” Kennedy, are buried nearby. The latter’s graves are marked with simple crosses and footstones. On December 1, 1971, Robert Kennedy’s body was reinterred 100 feet from its original June 1968 burial site.

The first soldier to be buried in Arlington was Private William Henry Christman of Pennsylvania on May 13, 1864.

Notable Civilians

  • Julian Bartley, Sr. (54) and his son Jay Bartley (20), killed together in the 1998 bombing of the U.S. embassy in Nairobi
  • Harry Blackmun, Thurgood Marshall, William O. Douglas and Potter Stewart, four justices of the Supreme Court of the United States
  • Leslie Coffelt, Secret Service member killed fighting off would-be-assassins of President Harry S. Truman in the 1950 assassination attempt at Blair House
  • George Washington Parke Custis, founder of Arlington Plantation, grandson of Martha Washington, step-grandson of President George Washington, father to Mary Anna Custis Lee.
  • Mary Lee Fitzhugh Custis, wife to George Washington Parke Custis, daughter of William Fitzhugh and Ann Bolling Randolph Fitzhugh, mother to Mary Anna Custis Lee.
  • Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, former First Lady and widow of John F. Kennedy
  • Phyllis Kirk, famous TV and film actress, alongside her husband.
  • James Parks, freedman, the only person buried at Arlington Cemetery who was born on the grounds.
  • Manuel Quezon (1878-1944) – see USS Maine memorial, later transferred to a cemetery in Manila
  • Mary Randolph, first person to be buried at Arlington Plantation, descendant of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, cousin to Mary Lee Fitzhugh Custis.
  • Marie Teresa Rios, author of Fifteenth Pelican, basis for The Flying Nun television show.
  • John Gibson and Jacob Chestnut, United States Capitol Police officers killed in the 1998 Capitol shooting attack
  • Leslie Sherman, student killed in the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre (her parents Holly and Anthony Sherman are both veterans and will be buried next to their daughter).

Whether or not they were wartime service members, U.S. presidents are eligible to be buried at Arlington, since they oversaw the armed forces as commanders-in-chief.

Four state funerals have been held at Arlington: those of Presidents William Howard Taft and John F. Kennedy, that of General John J. Pershing, and that of U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy.

 

THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT
[Personal Photo Collection]

The Washington Monument is an obelisk near the west end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate the first U.S. president, General George Washington. The monument, made of marble, granite, and bluestone gneiss, is both the world’s tallest stone structure and the world’s tallest obelisk, standing 555 feet 51⁄8 inches. There are taller monumental columns, but they are neither all stone nor true obelisks. It is also the tallest structure in Washington D.C.. It was designed by Robert Mills, an architect of the 1840s. The actual construction of the monument began in 1848 but was not completed until 1884, almost 30 years after the architect’s death. This hiatus in construction happened because of co-option by the Know Nothing party, a lack of funds, and the intervention of the American Civil War. A difference in shading of the marble, visible approximately 150 feet (46 m or 27%) up, shows where construction was halted for a number of years. The cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1848; the capstone was set on December 6, 1884, and the completed monument was dedicated on February 21, 1885. It officially opened October 9, 1888. Upon completion, it became the world’s tallest structure, a title previously held by the Cologne Cathedral. The monument held this designation until 1889, when the Eiffel Tower was completed in Paris, France. The monument stands due east of the Reflecting Pool and the Lincoln Memorial.

Pop Culture

As an iconic landmark of the US capital, the Washington Monument has featured in a number of film and television depictions. The symbolic meaning of the shape is referenced in the novel The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown. Its phallic resemblance is referenced in The Simpson’s episode “Mr. Lisa Goes to Washington” and the Futurama episode “A Taste of Freedom”, (where it is dwarfed by the fictional “Clinton Monument”). Its simplistic design is denigrated in The Simpsons episode “Father Knows Worst”.
The monument is a target for destruction in sci-fi/disaster films, comics and video games. It is destroyed in sci-fi/disaster films such Earth vs. the Flying Saucers, Mars Attacks! and 2012. It was destroyed in the Marvel Comics series X-Factor during a superhuman fight. In the DC Comics series called Guy Gardner: Warrior, it was toppled in a battle. In the same continuity, it was rebuilt. It was again demolished in the limited series Amazons Attack!! In video games such as Modern Warfare 2 it serves as a touchstone for a supposed evacuation of the city of Washington. In the game Fallout 3, the damaged monument is frequently visible to the player while outdoors, and it can be visited and ascended. Note that the depictions of the monument in Modern Warfare 2 and Fallout 3 are fanciful, as the monument is almost entirely supported by the masonry, not an internal metal superstructure.
One of the missions of the video game Splinter Cell: Conviction takes place around a county fair in front of the monument. The entrance of the monument serves as a meeting place for protagonist Sam Fisher with his old friend Victor Coste.
In the Home Improvement episode “Al’s Fair In Love And War”, Tim Taylor and Al Borland are discussing lighting on Tool Time. Tim holds up different pictures. First, he says, “This is the kind of lighting you want if you have a pool” and holds up a picture of a pool that is lit. Second, he says, “This is the kind of lighting you want if you have a patio” and holds up a picture of a lit porch. Finally, he says, “And this is the kind of lighting you want if you have a big monument” and holds up a picture of the Washington Monument with lights surrounding it as the music Hail to the Chief plays.
At the Restoring Honor Rally on August 28, 2010, Conservative commentator Glenn Beck noted the difference in coloring between the marble of the lower third of the monument and the marble on the top. Repeating a common misconception about why construction on the monument was halted, Beck said, “They stopped building it in the Civil War. And when the war was over, they began again.” Construction was halted in 1858 because the venture ran out of money. Beck also implied that only two words, “Laus Deo,” are written on the top of the monument; however, there are inscriptions on all four faces of the pyramidal point.
In Mike Leigh’s 2008 film Happy-Go-Lucky, the driver instructor character Scott further reveals his inner turmoil by describing the Washington Monument as being “555 feet above the ground, and 111 feet below the ground”, which according to him significantly add up to 666. This is the statement of a fictional character in a film, and not a matter of fact.
In NBC’s The Event, Season 1, Episode 15, “Face Off”, a group of aliens led by Sophia (Laura Innes) topples the Monument to warn President Elias Martinez (Blair Underwood) of their power and to intimidate the government and the public. Over 70 people are killed in the attack and hundreds are injured. The destruction of the monument marks the beginning of a full-scale war between Martinez and Sophia, and it is a symbol of the U.S. crumbling under Sophia’s people. It may also foreshadow future devastating events in the series.
In the Jeff Dunham comedy special Spark of Insanity, Dunham’s character Achmed the Dead Terrorist states that the Washington Monument “looks nothing like the guy(George Washington)”, and going on to say that it “looks more like a tribute to Bill Clinton.”

THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT

[Personal Photo Collection]

The Washington Monument is an obelisk near the west end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate the first U.S. president, General George Washington. The monument, made of marble, granite, and bluestone gneiss, is both the world’s tallest stone structure and the world’s tallest obelisk, standing 555 feet 51⁄8 inches. There are taller monumental columns, but they are neither all stone nor true obelisks. It is also the tallest structure in Washington D.C.. It was designed by Robert Mills, an architect of the 1840s. The actual construction of the monument began in 1848 but was not completed until 1884, almost 30 years after the architect’s death. This hiatus in construction happened because of co-option by the Know Nothing party, a lack of funds, and the intervention of the American Civil War. A difference in shading of the marble, visible approximately 150 feet (46 m or 27%) up, shows where construction was halted for a number of years. The cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1848; the capstone was set on December 6, 1884, and the completed monument was dedicated on February 21, 1885. It officially opened October 9, 1888. Upon completion, it became the world’s tallest structure, a title previously held by the Cologne Cathedral. The monument held this designation until 1889, when the Eiffel Tower was completed in Paris, France. The monument stands due east of the Reflecting Pool and the Lincoln Memorial.

Pop Culture

As an iconic landmark of the US capital, the Washington Monument has featured in a number of film and television depictions. The symbolic meaning of the shape is referenced in the novel The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown. Its phallic resemblance is referenced in The Simpson’s episode “Mr. Lisa Goes to Washington” and the Futurama episode “A Taste of Freedom”, (where it is dwarfed by the fictional “Clinton Monument”). Its simplistic design is denigrated in The Simpsons episode “Father Knows Worst”.

The monument is a target for destruction in sci-fi/disaster films, comics and video games. It is destroyed in sci-fi/disaster films such Earth vs. the Flying Saucers, Mars Attacks! and 2012. It was destroyed in the Marvel Comics series X-Factor during a superhuman fight. In the DC Comics series called Guy Gardner: Warrior, it was toppled in a battle. In the same continuity, it was rebuilt. It was again demolished in the limited series Amazons Attack!! In video games such as Modern Warfare 2 it serves as a touchstone for a supposed evacuation of the city of Washington. In the game Fallout 3, the damaged monument is frequently visible to the player while outdoors, and it can be visited and ascended. Note that the depictions of the monument in Modern Warfare 2 and Fallout 3 are fanciful, as the monument is almost entirely supported by the masonry, not an internal metal superstructure.

One of the missions of the video game Splinter Cell: Conviction takes place around a county fair in front of the monument. The entrance of the monument serves as a meeting place for protagonist Sam Fisher with his old friend Victor Coste.

In the Home Improvement episode “Al’s Fair In Love And War”, Tim Taylor and Al Borland are discussing lighting on Tool Time. Tim holds up different pictures. First, he says, “This is the kind of lighting you want if you have a pool” and holds up a picture of a pool that is lit. Second, he says, “This is the kind of lighting you want if you have a patio” and holds up a picture of a lit porch. Finally, he says, “And this is the kind of lighting you want if you have a big monument” and holds up a picture of the Washington Monument with lights surrounding it as the music Hail to the Chief plays.

At the Restoring Honor Rally on August 28, 2010, Conservative commentator Glenn Beck noted the difference in coloring between the marble of the lower third of the monument and the marble on the top. Repeating a common misconception about why construction on the monument was halted, Beck said, “They stopped building it in the Civil War. And when the war was over, they began again.” Construction was halted in 1858 because the venture ran out of money. Beck also implied that only two words, “Laus Deo,” are written on the top of the monument; however, there are inscriptions on all four faces of the pyramidal point.

In Mike Leigh’s 2008 film Happy-Go-Lucky, the driver instructor character Scott further reveals his inner turmoil by describing the Washington Monument as being “555 feet above the ground, and 111 feet below the ground”, which according to him significantly add up to 666. This is the statement of a fictional character in a film, and not a matter of fact.

In NBC’s The Event, Season 1, Episode 15, “Face Off”, a group of aliens led by Sophia (Laura Innes) topples the Monument to warn President Elias Martinez (Blair Underwood) of their power and to intimidate the government and the public. Over 70 people are killed in the attack and hundreds are injured. The destruction of the monument marks the beginning of a full-scale war between Martinez and Sophia, and it is a symbol of the U.S. crumbling under Sophia’s people. It may also foreshadow future devastating events in the series.

In the Jeff Dunham comedy special Spark of Insanity, Dunham’s character Achmed the Dead Terrorist states that the Washington Monument “looks nothing like the guy(George Washington)”, and going on to say that it “looks more like a tribute to Bill Clinton.”

THEODOR SEUSS GEISEL
[Personal Photo Collection]
Theodor Seuss Geisel was an American writer, poet and cartoonist most widely known for his children’s books written under the pen names Dr. Seuss, Theo LeSieg and, in one case, Rosetta Stone. He published 46 children’s books, which were often characterized by imaginative characters, rhyme, and frequent use of trisyllabic meter. His most celebrated books include the bestselling Green Eggs and Ham, The Cat in the Hat, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, Horton Hatches the Egg, Horton Hears a Who!, and How the Grinch Stole Christmas!. Numerous adaptations of his work have been created, including 11 television specials, three feature films, a Broadway musical and four television series. He won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1958 for Horton Hatches the Egg and again in 1961 for And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street.
Pen names and Pronounciation
 
Geisel’s pen name is regularly pronounced Sewss, an anglicized pronunciation inconsistent with his German surname. He himself noted that it rhymed with “voice” (his own pronunciation being and Alexander Liang (his collaborator on the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern) wrote of him:

You’re wrong as the deuce
And you shouldn’t rejoice
If you’re calling him Seuss.
He pronounces it Soice.

Geisel switched to the anglicized pronunciation from German because it “evoked a figure advantageous for an author of children’s books to be associated with—Mother Goose” and because most people used this pronunciation.
For books that Geisel wrote and others illustrated, he used the pen name 
 
"Theo LeSieg;" "Theo" is short for his own personal name of "Theodor," and "LeSieg" is "Geisel" backwards.

THEODOR SEUSS GEISEL

[Personal Photo Collection]

Theodor Seuss Geisel was an American writer, poet and cartoonist most widely known for his children’s books written under the pen names Dr. Seuss, Theo LeSieg and, in one case, Rosetta Stone. He published 46 children’s books, which were often characterized by imaginative characters, rhyme, and frequent use of trisyllabic meter. His most celebrated books include the bestselling Green Eggs and Ham, The Cat in the Hat, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, Horton Hatches the Egg, Horton Hears a Who!, and How the Grinch Stole Christmas!. Numerous adaptations of his work have been created, including 11 television specials, three feature films, a Broadway musical and four television series. He won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1958 for Horton Hatches the Egg and again in 1961 for And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street.

Pen names and Pronounciation

Geisel’s pen name is regularly pronounced Sewss, an anglicized pronunciation inconsistent with his German surname. He himself noted that it rhymed with “voice” (his own pronunciation being and Alexander Liang (his collaborator on the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern) wrote of him:

You’re wrong as the deuce

And you shouldn’t rejoice

If you’re calling him Seuss.

He pronounces it Soice.

Geisel switched to the anglicized pronunciation from German because it “evoked a figure advantageous for an author of children’s books to be associated with—Mother Goose” and because most people used this pronunciation.

For books that Geisel wrote and others illustrated, he used the pen name 

"Theo LeSieg;" "Theo" is short for his own personal name of "Theodor," and "LeSieg" is "Geisel" backwards.

 
HAUNTED TUNNEL, IRONTON, OHIO
[Personal Photo Collection]
For many years, the only north/south highway in and out of Ironton was State Route 75, a curvy, dangerous road that predated SR 93.
But one part of 75 was the worst. Right outside of Ironton, the road ran into a tunnel that chopped straight through the hillside.
The tunnel is 200 feet through solid sandstone and limestone. The problem is that it is only about 30 feet wide.
You see, this tunnel was never designed for automobiles. It was built in 1859 during the days of horse and buggy as a way to get the iron from the furnaces that dotted Lawrence County down to the Ohio River and ship it all over the world.
But it was just too small for two lanes of traffic. Even after it was expended in 1915, there continued to be many crashes. Countless people lost their lives.
It was around then the rumors started, at first quiet whisperings, but eventually growing to unchecked fear: The tunnel was cursed.
Many people felt it should be shut down. But the state didn’t listen to the warnings and didn’t put much stock in ghost stories.
Then tragedy struck.
It was a cold October night in 1959. But it just happened to be Halloween night.
There was a big football game. Ironton played Wellston. After the victory, everyone was excited and ready to make the trip home.
But, as the night got darker and the fog grew heavier, it became harder to see.
The school bus driver got careless. As he entered the north end of the tunnel, he didn’t honk his horns, he didn’t flash his lights.
He had no idea that a tanker truck had just fueled up and was headed out of town.
There simply wasn’t room for both.
The tragedy that ensued will forever go down in local lore as one of the most horrible and strange things ever to occur in these hills.
Old-timers say you could hear the screams for miles around. No matter how hard they tried, firefighters couldn’t get the flames to go out.
The fire burned for days and days.
Finally, the state stepped in, sealing off both ends of the tunnel, with all that wreckage and those bodies still inside.
And it stayed that way until 1989, when the Ironton Lions Club decided to reopen the tunnel as an historic attraction.
But the workers clearing it out reported many strange things.
It might be a brush across the back of your neck when no one is behind you. Or doors slamming in empty rooms. Or lights flickering and the faint sounds of horns honking in the far end of the tunnel.
Legend has it that these are the spirits of all those who were killed in the crash trying to escape.
And it always gets worse around Halloween.

HAUNTED TUNNEL, IRONTON, OHIO

[Personal Photo Collection]

For many years, the only north/south highway in and out of Ironton was State Route 75, a curvy, dangerous road that predated SR 93.

But one part of 75 was the worst. Right outside of Ironton, the road ran into a tunnel that chopped straight through the hillside.

The tunnel is 200 feet through solid sandstone and limestone. The problem is that it is only about 30 feet wide.

You see, this tunnel was never designed for automobiles. It was built in 1859 during the days of horse and buggy as a way to get the iron from the furnaces that dotted Lawrence County down to the Ohio River and ship it all over the world.

But it was just too small for two lanes of traffic. Even after it was expended in 1915, there continued to be many crashes. Countless people lost their lives.

It was around then the rumors started, at first quiet whisperings, but eventually growing to unchecked fear: The tunnel was cursed.

Many people felt it should be shut down. But the state didn’t listen to the warnings and didn’t put much stock in ghost stories.

Then tragedy struck.

It was a cold October night in 1959. But it just happened to be Halloween night.

There was a big football game. Ironton played Wellston. After the victory, everyone was excited and ready to make the trip home.

But, as the night got darker and the fog grew heavier, it became harder to see.

The school bus driver got careless. As he entered the north end of the tunnel, he didn’t honk his horns, he didn’t flash his lights.

He had no idea that a tanker truck had just fueled up and was headed out of town.

There simply wasn’t room for both.

The tragedy that ensued will forever go down in local lore as one of the most horrible and strange things ever to occur in these hills.

Old-timers say you could hear the screams for miles around. No matter how hard they tried, firefighters couldn’t get the flames to go out.

The fire burned for days and days.

Finally, the state stepped in, sealing off both ends of the tunnel, with all that wreckage and those bodies still inside.

And it stayed that way until 1989, when the Ironton Lions Club decided to reopen the tunnel as an historic attraction.

But the workers clearing it out reported many strange things.

It might be a brush across the back of your neck when no one is behind you. Or doors slamming in empty rooms. Or lights flickering and the faint sounds of horns honking in the far end of the tunnel.

Legend has it that these are the spirits of all those who were killed in the crash trying to escape.

And it always gets worse around Halloween.

cobrasnake asked
DUDE TOTAL FOLLOW YOU LIVE IN VA

.

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
[Personal Photo Collection]
 
Virginia Beach is an independent city located in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area of Virginia, on the Atlantic Ocean at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. Although Fairfax County is the most populous jurisdiction in the state of Virginia, Virginia Beach is the most populous city in the state, as well as the 39th largest city in the United States, with a population of 437,994 according to the 2010 census. 
Virginia Beach is the easternmost city of Hampton Roads that make up the core of the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC MSA. This area, known as “America’s First Region”, also includes the independent cities of Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Suffolk, as well as other smaller cities, counties and towns of Hampton Roads. 
Virginia Beach is a resort city with miles of beaches and hindreds of hotels, motels, and restaurants along its oceanfront. Every year the city host the East Coast Surfing Championships as well as the North American Sand Soccer Championship, a beach soccer tournament. It is also home to several state parks, several long-protected beach areas, three military bases, a number of large corporations, two universities, Edgar Cayce’s A.R.E. and numerous historic sites. Near the point where the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean meet, Cape Henry was the site of the first landing of the English colonists, who eventually settled in Jamestown, on April 26, 1607.
The city is listed in the Guinness Book of Records sa having the longest pleasure beach in the world. It is located at the southern end of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel, the longest bridge-tunnel complex in the world. 

Geography and Climate
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 497.3 square miles (1,288 km2). 248.3 square miles (643 km2) of it is land and 249.0 square miles (645 km2) of it (50.07%) is water. The average elevation is 12 feet (3.7 m) above sea level. A major portion of the city drains to the Chesapeake Bay by way of the Lynnhaven River and its tributaries.
The city is located at the southeastern corner of Virginia in the Hampton Roads area bordering the Atlantic Ocean. The Hampton Roads Metropolitan Statistical Area (officially known as the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC MSA) is the 34th largest in the United States, with a total population of 1,576,370. The area includes the Virginia cities of Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News,Poquoson, Portsmouth, Suffolk, Williamsburg, and the counties of Gloucester, Isle of Wight, James City, Mathews, Surry, andYork, as well as the North Carolina county of Currituck. While Virginia Beach is the most populated city within the MSA, it actually currently functions more as a suburb. The city of Norfolk is recognized as the central business district, while the Virginia Beach oceanside resort district and Williamsburg are primarily centers of tourism.
The climate of Virginia Beach is humid subtropical. Winters are very mild, and snowfall is light. Summers are hot and humid with warm evenings. The mean annual temperature is 59.6 °F(15.3 °C), with an average annual snowfall of 8.1 inches (210 mm) and an average annual rainfall of 45 inches (1,100 mm). The wettest seasons are the spring and summer, although rainfall is fairly constant all year round. The highest recorded temperature was 103 °F (39 °C) in August 1957, and the lowest recorded temperature was 4 °F (−16 °C) in January 1985.
Additionally, the geographic location of the city, with respect to the principal storm tracks, is especially favorable. It is south of the average path of storms originating in the higher latitudes, and north of the usual tracks of hurricanes and other major tropical storms, with the exception of Hurricane Isabel in 2003.

Economy
Virginia Beach is best known for its tourism but the military and agribusiness sectors contribute to the City’s economy. The City’s economy also contains a large retail component at places such as Lynnhaven Mall. Major companies headquartered in Virginia Beach include Amerigroup, the Christian Broadcasting Network and Operation Blessing International, Lillian Vernon and Stihl (North American headquarters). Other major employers include GEICO, VT andNavy Exchange Service Command. Virginia Beach was ranked at number 45 on Forbes list of best places for business and careers.


Tourism produces a large share of Virginia Beach’s economy. With an estimated $857 million spent in tourism related industries, 14,900 jobs cater to 2.75 million visitors. City coffers benefit as visitors provide $73 million in revenue. Virginia Beach opened a Convention Center in 2005 which caters to large group meetings and events. Hotels not only line the Oceanfront but also cluster around Virginia Beach Town Center and other parts of the City. Restaurants and entertainment industries also directly benefit from Virginia Beach’s tourism.
Virginia Beach has a large agribusiness sector which produces $80 million for the city economy. One hundred-seventy-two farms exist in Virginia Beach, mostly below the greenline in the southern portion of the City. Farmers are able to sell their goods and products at the City’s Farmer’s Market.

Culture

Virginia Beach is most often associated with the larger American South. People who have grown up in the Hampton Roads area often have a uniqueTidewater accentwhich sounds different from a stereotypicalSouthern accent. Vowels have a longer pronunciation than in a regular Southern accent.
The city is home to several points of interest in the historical, scientific, and performing arts areas, and has become a popular tourist destination in recent years. The Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center (formerly the Virginia Marine Science Museum) is a popular aquarium near the oceanfront that features the 300,000-gallon Norfolk Canyon Aquarium, containing sand tiger, nurse and brown sharks, as well as sting rays and other large open-ocean dwellers. There is also a 70,000-gallon sea turtle aquarium, sea turtle hatchling laboratory, hands-on ocean exploration exhibits, jellyfish and octopus aquariums, and even a life-size model of a humpback whale. Other features include the Owls Creek salt marsh and a nature trail.
The city’s largest festival, the Neptune Festival, attracts 500,000 visitors to the Oceanfront and 350,000 visitors to the air show at NAS Oceana. Celebrating the city’s heritage link with Norway, events are held in September in the Oceanfront and Town Center areas. Every August, the American Music Festival provides festival attendees with live music performed on stages all over the Oceanfront, including the beach on Fifth Street. The festival ends with the Rock and Roll Half Marathon.
 

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA

[Personal Photo Collection]

Virginia Beach is an independent city located in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area of Virginia, on the Atlantic Ocean at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. Although Fairfax County is the most populous jurisdiction in the state of Virginia, Virginia Beach is the most populous city in the state, as well as the 39th largest city in the United States, with a population of 437,994 according to the 2010 census. 

Virginia Beach is the easternmost city of Hampton Roads that make up the core of the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC MSA. This area, known as “America’s First Region”, also includes the independent cities of Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Suffolk, as well as other smaller cities, counties and towns of Hampton Roads. 

Virginia Beach is a resort city with miles of beaches and hindreds of hotels, motels, and restaurants along its oceanfront. Every year the city host the East Coast Surfing Championships as well as the North American Sand Soccer Championship, a beach soccer tournament. It is also home to several state parks, several long-protected beach areas, three military bases, a number of large corporations, two universities, Edgar Cayce’s A.R.E. and numerous historic sites. Near the point where the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean meet, Cape Henry was the site of the first landing of the English colonists, who eventually settled in Jamestown, on April 26, 1607.

The city is listed in the Guinness Book of Records sa having the longest pleasure beach in the world. It is located at the southern end of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel, the longest bridge-tunnel complex in the world. 

Geography and Climate

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 497.3 square miles (1,288 km2). 248.3 square miles (643 km2) of it is land and 249.0 square miles (645 km2) of it (50.07%) is water. The average elevation is 12 feet (3.7 m) above sea level. A major portion of the city drains to the Chesapeake Bay by way of the Lynnhaven River and its tributaries.

The city is located at the southeastern corner of Virginia in the Hampton Roads area bordering the Atlantic Ocean. The Hampton Roads Metropolitan Statistical Area (officially known as the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC MSA) is the 34th largest in the United States, with a total population of 1,576,370. The area includes the Virginia cities of Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News,Poquoson, Portsmouth, Suffolk, Williamsburg, and the counties of Gloucester, Isle of Wight, James City, Mathews, Surry, andYork, as well as the North Carolina county of Currituck. While Virginia Beach is the most populated city within the MSA, it actually currently functions more as a suburb. The city of Norfolk is recognized as the central business district, while the Virginia Beach oceanside resort district and Williamsburg are primarily centers of tourism.

The climate of Virginia Beach is humid subtropical. Winters are very mild, and snowfall is light. Summers are hot and humid with warm evenings. The mean annual temperature is 59.6 °F(15.3 °C), with an average annual snowfall of 8.1 inches (210 mm) and an average annual rainfall of 45 inches (1,100 mm). The wettest seasons are the spring and summer, although rainfall is fairly constant all year round. The highest recorded temperature was 103 °F (39 °C) in August 1957, and the lowest recorded temperature was 4 °F (−16 °C) in January 1985.

Additionally, the geographic location of the city, with respect to the principal storm tracks, is especially favorable. It is south of the average path of storms originating in the higher latitudes, and north of the usual tracks of hurricanes and other major tropical storms, with the exception of Hurricane Isabel in 2003.

Economy

Virginia Beach is best known for its tourism but the military and agribusiness sectors contribute to the City’s economy. The City’s economy also contains a large retail component at places such as Lynnhaven Mall. Major companies headquartered in Virginia Beach include Amerigroup, the Christian Broadcasting Network and Operation Blessing International, Lillian Vernon and Stihl (North American headquarters). Other major employers include GEICO, VT andNavy Exchange Service Command. Virginia Beach was ranked at number 45 on Forbes list of best places for business and careers.

Tourism produces a large share of Virginia Beach’s economy. With an estimated $857 million spent in tourism related industries, 14,900 jobs cater to 2.75 million visitors. City coffers benefit as visitors provide $73 million in revenue. Virginia Beach opened a Convention Center in 2005 which caters to large group meetings and events. Hotels not only line the Oceanfront but also cluster around Virginia Beach Town Center and other parts of the City. Restaurants and entertainment industries also directly benefit from Virginia Beach’s tourism.

Virginia Beach has a large agribusiness sector which produces $80 million for the city economy. One hundred-seventy-two farms exist in Virginia Beach, mostly below the greenline in the southern portion of the City. Farmers are able to sell their goods and products at the City’s Farmer’s Market.

Culture

Virginia Beach is most often associated with the larger American South. People who have grown up in the Hampton Roads area often have a uniqueTidewater accentwhich sounds different from a stereotypicalSouthern accent. Vowels have a longer pronunciation than in a regular Southern accent.

The city is home to several points of interest in the historical, scientific, and performing arts areas, and has become a popular tourist destination in recent years. The Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center (formerly the Virginia Marine Science Museum) is a popular aquarium near the oceanfront that features the 300,000-gallon Norfolk Canyon Aquarium, containing sand tiger, nurse and brown sharks, as well as sting rays and other large open-ocean dwellers. There is also a 70,000-gallon sea turtle aquarium, sea turtle hatchling laboratory, hands-on ocean exploration exhibits, jellyfish and octopus aquariums, and even a life-size model of a humpback whale. Other features include the Owls Creek salt marsh and a nature trail.

The city’s largest festival, the Neptune Festival, attracts 500,000 visitors to the Oceanfront and 350,000 visitors to the air show at NAS Oceana. Celebrating the city’s heritage link with Norway, events are held in September in the Oceanfront and Town Center areas. Every August, the American Music Festival provides festival attendees with live music performed on stages all over the Oceanfront, including the beach on Fifth Street. The festival ends with the Rock and Roll Half Marathon.

 
 
DEEP CREEK
[Personal Photo Collection]
Deep Creek is a former unincorporated town of the former Norfolk County (extinct) which since 1963 has been located in the independent city of Chesapeake in the South Hampton Roads region of southeastern Virginia. Deep Creek is located on the original route of U.S. Highway 17, also known as the Ocean Highway, and has been largely bypassed by modern highway improvements.
History
Deep Creek was a small settlement on the edge of the Great Dismal Swamp. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the unincorporated town was a busy stage-coach stop on the road between Norfolk and Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Until lumbering of the swamp was discontinued, it was the principal shipping point for the vast Dismal Swamp lumbering enterprises.
The northern portion of the Dismal Swamp Canal connects with the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River at Deep Creek. Paralleling U.S. 17, the historic canal is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and has been designated a National Civil Engineering Landmark. The Dismal Swamp Canal is now recognized as part of the National Underground Railroad and along with the Great Dismal Swamp, is noted as a former sanctuary for escaping slaves seeking freedom.
Modern times
In modern times, Deep Creek is a suburban community which retains some of its original rural character. This combination at Deep Creek of old and new is typical of the City of Chesapeake in general, which contains both large suburban commercial and residential areas in its northern portion, and vast area of undeveloped forests and wetlands along its southern perimeter, in addition to including a substantial portion of the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge.

DEEP CREEK

[Personal Photo Collection]

Deep Creek is a former unincorporated town of the former Norfolk County (extinct) which since 1963 has been located in the independent city of Chesapeake in the South Hampton Roads region of southeastern Virginia. Deep Creek is located on the original route of U.S. Highway 17, also known as the Ocean Highway, and has been largely bypassed by modern highway improvements.

History

Deep Creek was a small settlement on the edge of the Great Dismal Swamp. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the unincorporated town was a busy stage-coach stop on the road between Norfolk and Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Until lumbering of the swamp was discontinued, it was the principal shipping point for the vast Dismal Swamp lumbering enterprises.

The northern portion of the Dismal Swamp Canal connects with the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River at Deep Creek. Paralleling U.S. 17, the historic canal is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and has been designated a National Civil Engineering Landmark. The Dismal Swamp Canal is now recognized as part of the National Underground Railroad and along with the Great Dismal Swamp, is noted as a former sanctuary for escaping slaves seeking freedom.

Modern times

In modern times, Deep Creek is a suburban community which retains some of its original rural character. This combination at Deep Creek of old and new is typical of the City of Chesapeake in general, which contains both large suburban commercial and residential areas in its northern portion, and vast area of undeveloped forests and wetlands along its southern perimeter, in addition to including a substantial portion of the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge.

 

LUNA MOTH
[Personal Photo Collection]
Actias luna, commonly known as the Luna Moth, is a lime-green, Nearctic Saturniid moth in the subfamily Saturniinae. It has a wingspan of up to four and a half inches, making it one of the largest moths in North America.
Distribution
This moth is found in North America from east of the Great Plains in the United States to northern Mexico and from Manitoba eastward through central Quebec to Nova Scotia in Canada.
Lifecycle
Based on the climate in which they live, the Luna Moths produce differing numbers of generations. In Canada and northern regions, they can live up to 7 days and will produce only one generation per year. These reach adulthood from early June to early July. In the northeastern United States around New Jersey or New York, the moths produce two generations each year. The first of these appear in April and May, and the second group can be seen approximately nine to eleven weeks later. In the southern United States, there can be as many as three generations. These are spaced every eight to ten weeks beginning in March.
Host Plants
The caterpillars feed on the following host plants:
Betula (Birch) 
Alnus (Alder) 
Diospyros (Persimmon) 
Liquidambar (Sweetgum) 
Carya and Annamocarya (Hickory) 
Juglans (Walnut) 
Rhus (Sumac)
Pop Culture
The pharmaceutical company Sepracor markets its sleep medication Lunesta using a logo that incorporates the Luna moth.

LUNA MOTH

[Personal Photo Collection]

Actias luna, commonly known as the Luna Moth, is a lime-green, Nearctic Saturniid moth in the subfamily Saturniinae. It has a wingspan of up to four and a half inches, making it one of the largest moths in North America.

Distribution

This moth is found in North America from east of the Great Plains in the United States to northern Mexico and from Manitoba eastward through central Quebec to Nova Scotia in Canada.

Lifecycle

Based on the climate in which they live, the Luna Moths produce differing numbers of generations. In Canada and northern regions, they can live up to 7 days and will produce only one generation per year. These reach adulthood from early June to early July. In the northeastern United States around New Jersey or New York, the moths produce two generations each year. The first of these appear in April and May, and the second group can be seen approximately nine to eleven weeks later. In the southern United States, there can be as many as three generations. These are spaced every eight to ten weeks beginning in March.

Host Plants

The caterpillars feed on the following host plants:

  • Betula (Birch) 
  • Alnus (Alder) 
  • Diospyros (Persimmon) 
  • Liquidambar (Sweetgum) 
  • Carya and Annamocarya (Hickory) 
  • Juglans (Walnut) 
  • Rhus (Sumac)

Pop Culture

The pharmaceutical company Sepracor markets its sleep medication Lunesta using a logo that incorporates the Luna moth.